Posted by: Billy Marsh | August 30, 2010

J. C. Ryle On C. H. Spurgeon

In his little tract, Simplicity in Preaching, J. C. Ryle advocates studying sermons of men who have been successful preachers in order to learn how to structure a sermon in terms of style and divisions, not only in content. To serve as an example, he confesses, “I am not a bit ashamed to say that I often read the sermons of Mr. Spurgeon” (10). He then goes on to praise him stating,

Mr Spurgeon can preach most ably, and he proves it by keeping his enormous congregation together. We ought always to examine and analyze sermons which draw people together. Now when you read Mr. Spurgeon’s sermons note how clearly and perspicuously he divides a sermon, and fills each division with beautiful and simple ideas. How easily you grasp his meaning! How thoroughly he brings before you certain great truths, that hang to you like hooks of steel, and which, once planted in your memory, you never forget (10)!

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Responses

  1. “Mr Spurgeon can preach most ably, and he proves it by keeping his enormous congregation together.”

    Thanks for posting and I am a huge Spurgeon fan, but we must not forget that “itching ears” false doctrine fills the pews at many of today’s churches as well, so this yardstick needs to be held with the “right” hand. :-)

  2. I like that quotation.

    That’s a pretty smooth looking book cover too.


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